Is that really true?

This week’s note is a little longer than usual (I try to keep it under 400 words.) I hope you agree that today’s is worth the extra 234 words.  First, I could really use your help. I am doing research, what is the one area in your business that you would most like to have an easy to use process or practice that would make your business easier? Please drop me a note! Thanks

 
Now, this is cool…last week, my little blurb to you was about the idea of being mindful of what we say. I got this wonderful “comment” from Hannes in Belgium.
 
Hi Sharon,
 
I’d like to add that we as listeners have also a huge power over words. I find this often underestimated and undervalued. Usually people tend to think that the meaning is added to the words by the person who utters them.

But is that really true? I believe people do add meaning to the words we utter, but that that meaning isn’t true until it is properly received. A word spoken is a word half meant. Every word we receive is an invitation and a chance to complete its meaning.

It’s not the words that have the power to produce an outcome, it’s always the people who receive them and who decide to act upon what they perceive who have the power to define the outcome of every conversation.

What would happen to the world if we’d approach language like that?
– Truths would be something which only exist in agreement, between two people.
– Convincing and persuading people would be regarded as absurd since it would only mean that we would try to convey something which cannot be conveyed. You cannot completely transfer yourself to another person through words, let alone that this other person can completely receive you through those same words.
– People would be respected as authorities of their own self. Nobody knows you better than you do. Period.
– Statements would be questions.
– Demands would turn into invitations.
– …

Thank you for your thoughts.
Hannes Couvreur
Belgium

 

We’ve had some great exchanges since he shared the above. He recently added this blog post.

 

Don’t underestimate the power of listening

As listeners we have a huge power over words.

I often find this underestimated and undervalued.

Usually people tend to think that meaning is simply added to words by the person who utters them.

But is that really true?

I believe people do add meaning to the words we utter, but that that meaning isn’t true until it is properly received.

A word spoken is only a word half meant. Every word we receive is an invitation and a chance to complete its meaning.

Also, it’s not the words that have the power to produce an outcome, it’s always the people who receive them and who deceide to act upon what they perceive who have the power to define the outcome of every conversation.

What would happen to the world if we’d approach language like that?

* Listening would be regarded as an active act, not as something passive
* Listening empowers you, you’re not just a sitting duck wainting to get shot
* Listening is something you are responsible for when engaging in a conversation, since half of the meaning of the words uttered by other people comes from you
* Truths would be something which only exist in agreement, between two people.
* Convincing and persuading people would be regarded as absurd since it would only mean that we would try to convey something which cannot be conveyed. You cannot completely transfer yourself to another person through words, let alone that this other person can completely receive you through those same words.
* People would be respected as authorities of their own self. Nobody knows you better than you do. Period.
* Statements would be questions.
* Demands would turn into invitations.
* …

Thank you Sharon Sayler to inspire me to write this post.
Hannes

 

Thank you, Hannes, my new friend from far away. The power of a blog amazes me, everything I learn from these conversations enhance my life.

 

Have a great day in whatever your adventure.

To Success! To Life!

Sharon

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